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Language Arts - Grades Prek 8 Spring 2017 Page 10

Document-Based Questions

for Reading Comprehension and Critical Thinking

Give students practice in answering the types of questions used in standardized tests. Each easy-to-present lesson includes a high-interest story, a primary source document, and comprehension questions based on Bloom's Taxonomy. 112 pages. $14.99 each TCZ 8372 Grade 2 TCZ 8373 Grade 3 TCZ 8374 Grade 4 TCZ 8375 Grade 5 TCZ 8376 Grade 6 TCZ 9844 Document-Based Questions Set

(5 books)

$74.95

Differentiated Nonfiction Reading

Here's a way to teach the same grade-level content to students with varying reading skills! The same information is written at three different levels: below grade level, at grade level, and above grade level. All the students in your class can read the passage and have the information they need to respond to the same six questions that evaluate their comprehension of the subject matter. Correlated to the Common Core State Standards. 96 pages. $14.99 each TCZ 9990 Differentiated Nonfiction Reading Set

(5 books)

$74.95 TCZ 2919 Grade 2 TCZ 2920 Grade 3 TCZ 2921 Grade 4 TCZ 2922 Grade 5 TCZ 2923 Grade 6

Levels are subtly coded for teachers.

Targeting Comprehension Strategies for the Common Core

Strategies for teaching 12 reading comprehension skills are set forth in six-page lessons that guide students through the process of learning. The high-interest reading passages cover a variety of text types. Assessment tests are included, and the CD provides easy access to printable student pages and Common Core correlations. 112 pages + CD. $14.99 each TCZ 8031 Grade 2 TCZ 8035 Grade 3 TCZ 8036 Grade 4 TCZ 8048 Grade 5 TCZ 8053 Grade 6 TCZ 8054 Grade 7 TCZ 8055 Grade 8 TCZ 9952 Targeting Comprehension Strategies for the Common Core Set (7 books) $104.93 TCZ 9863 Social Studies Set

(6 books)

$101.94

Captivating articles with questions in test prep format

Nonfiction Reading Comprehension

High-interest, nonfiction articles help students learn about science and social studies topics while developing skills in reading comprehension. Each story is followed by questions that cover main idea, detail, vocabulary, and critical reasoning. The format is similar to that of standardized tests, so as students progress through the book's units, they are preparing for success in testing. 144 pages. $16.99 each

Social Studies

TCZ 8027 Grades 1-2 TCZ 8023 Grades 2-3 TCZ 8024 Grade 3 TCZ 8025 Grade 4 TCZ 8030 Grade 5 TCZ 8038 Grade 6

Science

TCZ 8026 Grades 1-2 TCZ 8020 Grades 2-3 TCZ 8021 Grade 3 TCZ 8022 Grade 4 TCZ 8028 Grade 5 TCZ 8037 Grade 6 TCZ 9862 Science Set

(6 books)

$101.94

#2922 Nonfiction Differentiated Reading 36 Teacher Created Resources, Inc.

Reading Passage-Geography

Oceans: What's Up Down There?

You have learned that Earth has five oceans. The Pacific is the deepest and the largest, and the Atlantic is the second largest. Then, there's the Indian Ocean and the Southern Ocean, which surrounds Antarctica. The smallest ocean is the Arctic. The Southern and Arctic Oceans spend a lot of the year under ice. Massive floating chunks of ice called icebergs originate in these two oceans. They float into the northern Atlantic and southern Pacific. Ships must avoid them. Running into an iceberg could sink a ship. There are streams of moving water called currents in the oceans. This water circulation is essential in moving heat around the world. Heated water flows from the equator toward the poles in the surface currents. Cold water flows toward the equator in deep, underwater currents. Beneath the ocean's waves there are mountains, deep trenches, and flat plains. We know about them because submarines and remotely operated vehicles have gone down there and photographed them. People discovered the continental shelves first. The continental shelves are huge plates of Earth. They hold both land and sea. All the land on one plate belongs to the same continent. That's why Greenland is part of the North American continent while Australia is its own continent. The water on a continental shelf is considered shallow, even though it may be 490 feet deep! The continental slopes are the edges of these shelves. The slopes may have steep sides. At the base of the slopes are the abyssal plains. These flatlands make up most of the seafloor. Formed by fine sediment deposits, they are the flattest parts of Earth's crust. In some places, the plains are broken by tall underwater mountain chains, or ridges. The largest is the Mid-Atlantic Ridge, which extends 34,000 miles as it wanders through the Atlantic, Indian, south Pacific, and Arctic Oceans. Usually, the underwater mountains formed from lava spewing from deep-sea vents. A seamount is one of these mountains that rises at least 3,300 feet above the seafloor. Every moment of every day, volcanoes are erupting somewhere on the ocean floor. When a seamount gets tall enough, it bursts through the ocean's surface and is considered land. This is how all volcanic islands form, including the Hawaiian island chain. One of the most amazing parts of the undersea world is its deep trenches. They are like gigantic cracks in the ocean floor. The Mariana Trench in the Pacific Ocean is more than 35,700 feet (7 miles) deep- and that's starting at the ocean floor, not the surface! Not only is it the world's deepest sea trench, but it is seven times deeper than the Grand Canyon. In 1995, Japan sent a remote-controlled submarine to the base of this trench. It sent back the first photos people had ever seen. There is dangerously high water pressure that far down. It wouldn't be safe for humans to try to go there.

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Reading Passage-Geography

Oceans: What's Up Down There?

You have learned that Earth has five oceans. The Pacific is the deepest and the largest, and the Atlantic is the second largest. Then, there's the Indian Ocean and the Southern Ocean, which surrounds Antarctica. The smallest ocean is the Arctic. The Southern and Arctic Oceans spend a lot of the year under ice. Massive floating chunks of ice called icebergs originate in these two oceans. They float into the northern Atlantic and southern Pacific. Ships must avoid them. Running into an iceberg could sink a ship. There are streams of moving water called currents in the oceans. This water circulation is essential in moving heat around the world. Heated water flows from the equator toward the poles in the surface currents. Cold water flows toward the equator in deep, underwater currents. Beneath the ocean's waves there are mountains, deep trenches, and flat plains. We know about them because submarines and remotely operated vehicles have gone down there and photographed them. People discovered the continental shelves first. The continental shelves are huge plates of Earth. They hold both land and sea. All the land on one plate belongs to the same continent. That's why Greenland is part of the North American continent while Australia is its own continent. The water on a continental shelf is considered shallow, even though it may be 490 feet deep! The continental slopes are the edges of these shelves. The slopes may have steep sides. At the base of the slopes are the abyssal plains. These flatlands make up most of the seafloor. Formed by fine sediment deposits, they are the flattest parts of Earth's crust. In some places, the plains are broken by tall underwater mountain chains, or ridges. The largest is the Mid-Atlantic Ridge, which extends 34,000 miles as it wanders through the Atlantic, Indian, south Pacific, and Arctic Oceans. Usually, the underwater mountains formed from lava spewing from deep-sea vents. A seamount is one of these mountains that rises at least 3,300 feet above the seafloor. Every moment of every day, volcanoes are erupting somewhere on the ocean floor. When a seamount gets tall enough, it bursts through the ocean's surface and is considered land. This is how all volcanic islands form, including the Hawaiian island chain. One of the most amazing parts of the undersea world is its deep trenches. They are like gigantic cracks in the ocean floor. The Mariana Trench in the Pacific Ocean is more than 35,700 feet (7 miles) deep- and that's starting at the ocean floor, not the surface! Not only is it the world's deepest sea trench, but it is seven times deeper than the Grand Canyon. In 1995, Japan sent a remote-controlled submarine to the base of this trench. It sent back the first photos people had ever seen. There is dangerously high water pressure that far down. It wouldn't be safe for humans to try to go there. Passa

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Teacher Created Resources, Inc. 35 #2922 Nonfiction Differentiated Reading

Reading Passage-Geography

Oceans: What's Up Down There?

You know that Earth has five oceans. The Pacific is the deepest and the largest. The Atlantic is the second largest. Then, there's the Indian Ocean. The Southern Ocean surrounds Antarctica. The smallest ocean is the Arctic. The Southern and Arctic Oceans have a lot of ice. Large floating chunks of ice called icebergs originate in these two oceans. They float into the northern Atlantic and southern Pacific. Ships must do all they can to avoid them. Hitting an iceberg could easily sink a ship. The oceans have many different streams of moving water called currents. This water circulation is essential. It disperses heat around the world. Heated water flows from the equator toward the poles. The warm water moves in surface currents. Cold water flows toward the equator. The cool water moves in deeper, underwater currents. Below the ocean's waves there are flat plains. There are mountains and deep trenches, too. We know all of this because submarines and remotely operated vehicles have gone down there. They've brought back photos. People discovered the continental shelves first. The continental shelves are huge plates of Earth. Each one holds both land and sea. All the land on one plate belongs to the same continent. That's why Greenland is part of the North American continent. It's why Australia is its own continent. The water on a continental shelf is considered shallow. Yet it may be 490 feet deep! The continental slopes are the edges of these shelves. Some slopes have steep sides. At the base of the slopes are the abyssal plains. These flatlands make up most of the seafloor. They are the flattest parts of Earth's crust. In some places, the plains are broken by tall underwater mountains. The mountains come in chains, or ridges. The largest is the Mid-Atlantic Ridge. It extends 34,000 miles as it wanders through the Atlantic, Indian, south Pacific, and Arctic Oceans. Most often, the underwater mountains formed from lava spewing from deep-sea vents. A seamount is one of these mountains. It rises at least 3,300 feet above the seafloor. Each moment of each day, volcanoes are erupting somewhere on the ocean floor. Lava is always flowing. When a seamount gets tall enough, it bursts through the ocean's surface. Then, it is considered land. This is how all volcanic islands form, including the Hawaiian islands. One of the most amazing parts of the undersea world is its deep trenches. They are like huge cracks in the ocean floor. The Mariana Trench is in the Pacific Ocean. It is more than 35,700 feet (7 miles) deep. And that's starting at the ocean floor, not the surface! It is the world's deepest sea trench. It is about seven times deeper than the Grand Canyon, too. In 1995, Japan sent a remote-controlled submarine to this trench. It went down to the bottom and sent back photos. It was the first time humans had ever seen such a sight. Since there is very high water pressure that far down, it wouldn't be safe for humans to go there.

below at above Same questions for all 3 reading levels

10

Language Arts

Grades 1-8

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